March 20, 2019

NIV Giant Print Compact Bible

After reviewing Bibles I’d purchased over the years, Bible publishers began sending me review copies of new translations, study editions, children’s Bibles, and other biblical resources, but every now and then I buy one I want to fill a gap.

Although I have various editions of the New International Version (NIV), I wanted a large print reader edition – without the distraction of footnotes – to just sit down and read. For me, that necessitates either a paperback edition or a soft, flexible, yummy-to-the-touch leather binding, which this premium leather edition certainly has. (For study Bibles with lots of articles and footnotes, however, I prefer hardbacks to join the row along my desk, where they’ll stand at attention without slouching as leather or paperbacks are apt to do.)

When it comes to font sizes though, Zondervan and I do not see eye to eye (pun intended.) For them, the easy-on-the-eyes font in this edition is considered, “giant print.” For me, that’s a misnomer as I consider nothing less than 14-point “giant” with 17-point being super-sized. Yet this “giant print” edition has about 10-point type, which, fortunately, is just right for me.

The clear font, premium leather binding, and single column page layout encourage me to snuggle into my favorite chair (yeah, over-stuffed soft leather) and keep reading, as I would with any inviting text. With other books though, I’m apt to put the book away (often for years) or pass it on to someone else if I don’t expect to ever read it again.

Not so with the NIV Giant Print Compact Bible. Lord willing, I’ll read it again and again, which is why I appreciate the overall size and sewn-in pages able to withstand years of wear.

I also appreciate having two ribbon markers as my Sunday School class studies the Hebrew Bible (aka Old Testament) while my Wednesday morning discussion group studies the New. In between though, I love to read the Psalms, so a third ribbon would have been nice, but one mustn’t be picky. Just having the Word of God in a conversational, thought-for-thought translation is a blessing that lasts longer than leather.


by Mary Harwell Sayler, © 2019, poet-writer, reviewer, pray-er





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