Showing posts with label Thomas Nelson. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Thomas Nelson. Show all posts

April 18, 2017

KJV Thinline Bible, large print, hardback


BookLook Bloggers sent me a copy of the large print KJV Thinline Bible in a colorful green hardback to review, and I really like the sturdy quality, double ribbon markers, words of Christ in red, and especially, the rounded, well-inked 10-point font that the publisher, Thomas Nelson, commissioned for their production of the King James Version of the Bible.

Although this edition does not have all of the books included in the original KJV (aka Apocryphal books), it does include clear, colored maps and "30 Days with Jesus" to take readers through the life, death, and resurrection of the Lord.

As you probably know by now, I prefer quality leather covers for regular reading, but I requested this particular reader edition for several reasons:

• A sturdy hardback works best on the bookshelves in our Fellowship Hall as this won’t flop around like a paperback or get musty as quickly as some leather covers might.

• The easy-to-read font works well for church members who forget their study Bibles and/or their reading glasses.

• The attractive green cover brings to mind Christ as the Vine and we as the branches who have no spiritual life or power apart from Him.

• This thinline edition is easy to carry and makes an excellent choice for reading in a waiting room, on a train or plane, or anywhere you happen to be.

Mary Harwell Sayler, © 2017, is a poet-writer, reviewer who welcomes review copies of new editions and translations in 10-point type or larger, reader editions in premium leather, sturdy hardback study Bibles, Bible storybooks, children’s Bibles actually designed for children, and Bible resources such as a Bible dictionary, atlas, or encyclopedia. Send your review copy to Mary Sayler, P.O. Box 62, Lake Como, FL 32157.

KJV Thinline Bible, large print, cloth over board hardback




I review for BookLook Bloggers

February 23, 2017

Precious Prayers Bible, NKJV

I love the idea of children developing the habit of regularly opening a “real Bible” from an early age, and the NKJV (New King James Version) makes a good choice because of its kinship with the beloved King James Version (KJV) – but without the heightened language. Regardless of the translation used by adults in a church or family, the NKJV is excellent for memorization. I just wish this edition had taken advantage of that by including sidebars of Bible verses that children do well to learn and recall throughout their lives.

Reportedly, the font in this new edition for children is 9.5 type but appears smaller, especially since the ink seems to be dark grey, rather than black. I mention this because children drawn to the precious art are apt to be younger, so the biblical text may require more eye-focus and reading skill than most early readers have acquired.

That said, the age-appropriate poems, prayers, and blessings written primarily by Jean Fischer appear in kid-friendly print and language with Precious Moments™ artwork on slick paper inserts. Because of those inserts, young readers can turn to prayers that speak well for them, which most, if not all, surely will. Also, the thicker paper makes those pages sturdier than the thinner paper on which the New King James Version (NKJV) translation of the Bible has been printed.

The nicely padded hardcover should hold up well too. And, since this edition includes maps and introductions to each book of the Bible, a child can continue to use the Precious Prayers Bible for years to come.

Review by Mary Harwell Sayler, © 2017, who received a complimentary copy from BookLook bloggers in exchange for an honest review.

Precious Prayers Bible, NKJV, padded hardcover




I review for BookLook Bloggers

December 13, 2016

NKJV Airship Genesis Kids Study Bible

When I received a complimentary copy of the new Kids Study Bible in NKJV (New King James Version) from BookLook Bloggers, the first thing I noticed was David Jeremiah’s name in goldish letters that stood out from the rest. This visual emphasis on a person rather than the translation or on the presentation of a study edition for children would quite likely have been a decision made by the publisher Thomas Nelson, rather than the author of the study materials, but a reversal would make more sense.

That said, the “Airship Genesis: Legendary Bible Adventure” logo on the slightly padded front cover will most likely appeal to the children for whom this edition exists. As they open the book and turn the title page, the bold lettering Psalm 119:105 will surely catch their eyes, informing young readers in all caps:

"YOUR WORD IS A LAMP TO MY FEET AND A LIGHT TO MY PATH.”

Now that’s an important emphasis!

Likewise, David Jeremiah’s warm greeting in the Foreword gets readers off to a blessed start and says, “The Bible is the best book you’ll ever own, and it’s important to read it each day.” That simple statement might be exactly what a child needs to begin a lifelong love of God’s Word. At least, that’s what happened when my Sunday School teacher said similar words to me, which got me started reading the Bible regularly as a child – a habit that continues decades later.

Even more important, the Foreword embraces each child with these loving words:

“My greatest prayer is that you’ll come to know the Hero of the Bible – the Lord Jesus Christ – as your Savior, Lord, and Friend. He has a wonderful plan for your life; and as you study His Word, you’ll understand it more and more.”

To help young readers understand, the next page bullet-points the author’s answers to “What Is the Bible All About?”

The Love Of God
The Results Of Unbelief
The Gift Of Life
The Reason Jesus Had To Die
The Importance Of Faith
The Result Of Faith
The Assurance Of Heaven

In addition to a Bible reference and brief statement about each of those points, the author then lets readers know they can ask for the gift of the Holy Spirit in their lives. The context and light touch make that very likely!

Next comes several kid-appealing action figures who will act as guides throughout this study edition. For example, Genesis 11 includes the “Rupert Report” on the Chaldeans which says:

“That h is silent: Chaldeans is pronounced Kal-dee-ens. They were a group of people that, in ancient times, lived in the place we identify today as Iraq and Iran. A very important Bible hero was a Chaldean: Abraham.”

Other sidebars place a spotlight on a variety of “Bible Heroes.” For example, 1 Samuel 15 gives a glimpse of “Samuel, the Bold Prophet” with this illustration:

“If you saw someone doing something wrong, what would you do? It depends. You might need to tell a teacher or your parent or another adult. Or you might have to say something yourself. That’s what a prophet named Samuel did. He knew that Saul, the king of Israel, had disobeyed God. And Samuel knew he had to say something to the king. So Samuel spoke to the king about what he had done. It was difficult because God removed Saul from being king. But Samuel knew he needed to be bold.

Being bold can feel scary. But God wants us to do and say the right things for Him. God can use us to make the world a better place.”


Still other sidebars present short articles, memory verses, and in-text maps to help readers envision and apply God’s Word as they read. In addition, “Power Force” insets focus on biblical truths or goals such as “Be Trusting,” which says:

“Sometimes little kids are afraid to jump off a diving board for the first time. So a parent gets in the pool and says, ‘I’ll catch you!’ The child has to decide is she trusts her parent or not. Almost always, the child jumps and learns that she can trust her parent to catch her. It’s the same with God. We trust His promises, His love, and His protection. Our job is to leap into His arms where we are always safe.”

Amen.

Mary Harwell Sayler, poet-writer reviewer, ©2016

NKJV Airship Genesis Kids Study Bible, hardcover


NKJV Airship Genesis Kids Study Bible, imitation leather




I review for BookLook Bloggers



November 18, 2016

NKJV Know The Word Study Bible

For those of us who really, really want to know The Word of God, any reputable study edition will help us toward that goal. The new NKJV Know The Word Study Bible published by Thomas Nelson differs mainly by making that goal a strong focus as we read.

Having received a complimentary copy from BookLook Bloggers for my always-honest review, I like how this edition emphasizes three ways to study the Bible:

Book by Book
Verse by Verse
Topic by Topic

If you choose the latter as your starting point, the front matter immediately provides that option, right after the Table of Contents, rather than in the back matter, which typically occurs near the index. This upfront placement gives clear access to God’s Word by highlighting key topical verses and “Topic-By-Topic Articles” on the Trinity, Love, Salvation, Suffering, and other vital subjects.

For a Book-by-Book study, the edition offers introductions to each book with a Summary, How To Study that particular book, and the highlights covered in the text, which most study editions also provide.

For a Verse-by-Verse investigation of God’s word, footnotes offer insights and information that add to our understanding of the text, which, in this case, is the New King James Version (NKJV) of the Bible – one of my favorite translations.

The light font and bleed-through on thin paper make this edition harder to read than some, but it’s exactly the Bible I’ve been wanting to place on the bookshelf at church. When members of our study group forget to bring a Bible from home, they’ll have a good edition with helpful notes to contribute to the class discussion, and the Topic-by-Topic feature provides a fine choice for guiding future studies.

Mary Harwell Sayler, poet-writer, reviewer, ©2016

NKJV Know the Word Study Bible



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March 12, 2012

Bible Reviewer on NKJV reader edition


Having grown up with the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible, I did not become an instant fan of the New KJV when Thomas Nelson released it in 1982. Then (and now as new English translations appear) my first inclination was to compare Bible verses, especially those favorites I memorized as a child and did not want anyone to change! Thirty years later, however, a God-incidence changed me and my mind.

During Lent, I felt drawn to reading the Bible cover to cover without footnotes or articles to distract me, which meant I needed a reader edition. Since I prefer either paperback or genuine leather, the poor quality bindings available in the Christian book store discouraged me, and I was prepared to leave empty-handed when I saw a box labeled “genuine leather” but available only in the NKJV. I started to pass it by then saw it been marked down. Below $50 seemed like an incredible price for a good quality leather Bible – even one with Thomas Nelson’s lifetime warranty. Although that Bible publishing company has had a fine reputation for over 200 years, I still felt skeptical as I opened the box, but here’s what I found:

Genuine Leather – Thick, supple, and of good quality, this leather looks and feels sturdy and long-lasting. By applying a leather conditioner or handling with hands very lightly coated in mineral oil, the softness increases even more.

Font Size
– The very readable 9-point font looks to be the equivalent of a 10 to 11-point type found in word processing software such as Microsoft Word.

Single-Column Bible – Instead of the line breaks that typically occur with a KJV or NKJV, this edition has the regular paragraphing used in most books, which make reading more natural and easy on the eyes.

Headings – The addition of headings also adds visual interest and helps readers readily locate passages.

NKJV – Considered to be a word-for-word translation like the KJV, this English version is highly accurate, too, but with the advantage of biblical scholarship in areas such as word origins or etymology. Like the KJV, the NKJV offers intelligent word choices, a devotional tone, poetic quality, and literary excellence while offering easy-to-comprehend contemporary English.

The format and paragraphing has made this Bible as easy to read as any book, but the translation itself has certainly helped too. Instead of comparing this verse to that, I immediately got caught up in the ongoing story of our relationship with God and settled in to enjoy this good, good read:


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© 2012, Mary Harwell Sayler. If you want your church, Bible study, or other group to have this information, please tell people where you found it. Thanks. For more Bible topics and articles for Christian poets and writers, see Blogs by Mary.

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